Faculty Notes

CHDS Instructor Wins Williams Outstanding Professor Award

Richard Bergin

Richard Bergin IV, Instructor at the Center for Homeland Defense and Security at the Naval Postgraduate School, has won the Lieutenant Commander David L. Williams Outstanding Professor Award. The award will be presented to him at NPS graduation ceremonies on Tuesday, December 5, 2006, at 3:00pm in King Hall.

Richard Bergin joined the CHDS faculty in April 2004 to teach Technology for Homeland Security, and now leads technology instruction and research in the program. Professor Bergin has shared his research interests communities of practice, security of information sharing, and adoption/diffusion issues with his students, encouraging them to conduct cutting-edge research for thesis projects and publication. His commitment to the students and the program as well as his progressive teaching style have resulted in consistent evaluation scores and feedback unparalleled elsewhere in the program and rarely seen in academia. His contribution to the success of the program and its students is significant, tangible, and remarkable.

The David L. Williams Outstanding Professor Award is presented quarterly to the faculty member of the School of International Graduate Studies who has demonstrated the greatest dedication to the learning and intellectual growth of students, in residence and abroad, and through that dedication had the greatest impact on the individual students and the course as a whole.


CHDS Professor receives the LCDR David L. Williams Outstanding Professor Award

David Tucker recieves award

CHDS Professor Dr. David Tucker received the LCDR David L. Williams Outstanding Professor Award during the Naval Postgraduate School's fall graduation award ceremony held on December 6, 2005.

The award is named for LCDR David L. Williams, U.S. Navy, who was a National Security Affairs graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School in December 1996. In August 2000, LCDR Williams joined the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. This outstanding young naval officer was killed in the terrorist attack on the Pentagon on September, 2001.

This award is presented quarterly to the faculty member of the School of International Graduate Studies who has demonstrated the greatest dedication to the learning and intellectual growth of students, in residence and abroad, and on the individual students and the course as a whole.

Dr. Tucker has been an instrumental part of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security from its inception and continues to make significant contributions to the improvement of the Center and its curriculum. He teaches the Asymmetric Conflict and Homeland Security course.

Foundation Executive Director Merrill Ruck presents Professor David Tucker the LCDR David L. Williams Outstanding Professor Award.


CHDS Professor receives the 2005 Havel Foundation Vision 97 Award

Philip Zimbardo receives award

NPS Senior Fellow Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D. has been awarded the Dagmar and Vaclav Havel Foundation Vision 97 Award for 2005. Zimbardo received the award in Prague for "his efforts to enhance the human condition by countering evil, ignorance and shyness through research, teaching and social action." The foundation, established by former Czech President Havel and his wife, Dagmar, have awarded the annual prize since 1999 "to an individual whose work has made a major contribution to broadening human horizons, drawing attention to lesser-known phenomena and contexts, integrating science into the general culture and promoting human views of the world." Past winners include Austrian-born U.S. neurosurgeon Karl Pribram; Robert Reich, U.S. secretary of labor during the Clinton administration; and Italian writer Umberto Eco.

Dr. Zimbardo has been a professor with CHDS since 2003, teaching NS 4133 Psychology of Terrorism & Fear. Dr. Zimbardo is internationally recognized as an innovative researcher in many areas of psychology. He has won numerous awards for his distinguished teaching, writing, research, and media productions. Zimbardo has been called the "voice and image of modern psychology" because of his popular PBS-TV series, Discovering Psychology (shown nationally and internationally over the past decade), and his best selling text, Psychology and Life, the oldest, continuously selling textbook in psychology (soon in its 17th edition). He has been President of the American Psychological Association (2002), and formerly of the Western Psychological Association.