Course

NS3180: Introduction to Homeland Security

This course provides an overview of the essential ideas that constitute the emerging discipline of homeland security. It has two central objectives: to expand the way participants think, analyze and communicate about homeland security; and to assess knowledge in critical homeland security knowledge domains.

Course

NS3210: The Unconventional Threat to Homeland Security

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. It considers those who act as individuals, in small groups or in large organizations. By the end of the course, students should be able to design effective measures for countering and responding to terrorism based on an understanding of its organizational and operational dynamics.

Course

IS4010: Technology for Homeland Security

In today’s Information Age, Homeland Security professionals and the agencies they lead are more dependent than ever on technology to strengthen national preparedness. The need to detect particular threats, communicate, create and transfer information and knowledge through the use of interoperable technologies in real-time has become even more critical to our national security. This course provides Homeland Security professionals with the requisite knowledge and critical thinking skills to better understand, analyze, select, implement, and use technology within and among Homeland Security organizations.

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NS4156: Intelligence for Homeland Security: Organizational and Policy Challenges

This course examines key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense. Students will have the opportunity to fully address policy, organizational and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support.

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NS3014 and NS4081: Research Sequence

The purpose of the research sequence (NS3014 and NS4081) is to advance critical thinking, research and inquiry skills; students will use these skills to produce a strong thesis proposal (in this course sequence), and then later for the final thesis. This course sequence identifies and practices the main steps and modalities of good research: the construction of research questions; literature review; hypothesis testing; proper handling of arguments, claims, and evidence; problem statements; research design and planning; research methods.

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CS3660: Critical Infrastructure: Vulnerability Analysis and Protection

Critical Infrastructure is one of the cornerstones of homeland security. At the completion of the course, students will be able to apply a risk-based approach to model and assess critical infrastructures. Students will learn how specific infrastructure sectors function and will conduct a full assessment of an infrastructure that includes modeling, analysis, and policy recommendations.

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NS4755: Strategic Planning and Budgeting for Homeland Security

Employing a social entrepreneurship approach to the strategic process, this course will provide students with the necessary methodological tools and content to think differently about strategy, manage complex challenges, and facilitate a planning process that fosters innovation and positive change in the homeland security enterprise.

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NS4881: Multi-discipline Approaches to Homeland Security

Homeland security efforts in the United States constitute a project framed by the rule of law and boundaries of discourse. Constitutional concerns, civil rights issues, ethical questions, and the roles of the various disciplines engaged in the effort are driven and impacted by the various local, state, and federal systems of law, and also by public, media, and political narratives. This course allows students to explore the homeland security project in relation to the laws, narratives, and ideas that support and constrain it.

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NS3028: Comparative Government for Homeland Security

The objectives of the NS 3028 course are: (1) to understand the transnational nature of terrorism, organized crime, pandemics and other homeland security threats, (2) to assess homeland security strategies employed by liberal democracies around the world; (3) to distill and extrapolate policy implications from these examples; and (4) to apply these lessons to the organizational and functional challenges faced by homeland security leaders in the United States. The course will focus both on a discussion of shared threats such as the global Jihadi movement, Al-Qaeda activity in Afghanistan/Pakistan, Middle Eastern groups such as Hamas and Hezbollah as well as policies and strategies employed by a range of democratic countries to cope with terrorism and other homeland security-related threats. In addition to looking at specific countries, the course will also look at issue areas such as bio-threats, health system preparedness, airport security, and anti-radicalization policies across a number of countries. This course will provide students with a knowledge-base and methodology with which to learn from the practices of other countries and translate those practices into policies applicable in the United States. The course will also enable students to better understand the threats that other countries face (many of which are likely to affect the United States in the near term) and how they cope with those threats. Finally, the course will enable students to be better prepared to engage with their international partners at the local, state, or federal levels as Homeland Security becomes an increasingly global undertaking and all levels of government in the United States move towards conducting greater international outreach.

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NS4239: Special Topics in American Government for Homeland Security

The purpose of this course is to provide participants with an insight into the structural, conceptual and intellectual underpinnings and implications of the homeland security project. Looking at a wide range of topics and problems, the course seeks to stimulate a comprehensive discussion of how homeland security professionals and the general public think about homeland security; whether/why there may be significant differences in professional and public perceptions of homeland security; and how those differences constrain/leverage various elements of the homeland security effort. By incorporating a selection of key texts in Western political and social thought alongside current topical writings, the course seeks to equip participants with a deeper understanding of the prevailing discourse and its impact on the homeland security project.

Course

NS4910: Internet, Society, and Cyberconflict

This course examines the internet in its broader social and policy context with a particular focus on threats in, of, and to the internet. The course considers the relevant questions of identity, agency, legitimacy, regulation, and innovation in the cyber realm from all angles, including public policy, national security, U.S. law, and international norms. It also will study the views, practices, and ethos of such other stakeholders as developers, hacktivists, tech entrepreneurs, and the public. This course introduces students to exponential thinking and advances their practice of strategic foresight as regards the ways that internet technologies currently under development may affect homeland security in the future.

Course

NS4232: Knowledge into Practice: A Homeland Security Capstone Course

This course is intended to provide participants the opportunity to review and integrate the knowledge and technical learning acquired in the courses leading up to the capstone. This course will reinforce the motivation and skills needed to perform their professional roles in ways that will initiate and sustain change within the homeland security enterprise.